Start Radiocarbon dating organic materials

Radiocarbon dating organic materials

Likewise, on November 12, 2012, the author of the Naturalis Historia blog posted a lengthy article on Lake Suigetsu (https://thenaturalhistorian.com/creationism/) which included a reproduction of Figure 7 from the Davidson and Wolgemuth (2010) paper. Alternating patterns of distinct laminae are commonly identified within glacial lake deposits and are generally interpreted in the following way: during the summer months as meltwaters increase flow to the lakes, layers of more coarse sediment are formed, whereas the decreased meltwater in winter results in thinner, more clay-rich layers.

However, recent research by Schieber, Southard and Thaisen (2007) and Schieber and Yawar (2009), using the Indiana University Flume Laboratory, has demonstrated that the commonly observed laminated mudrocks, so prevalent throughout the rock record and around the globe, formed by moving water, and energetic deposition.

Their experiments showed that mudrocks, and laminae in particular, form not by slow deposition out of a stagnant water column, but by flowing water at speeds of 0.3 m/sec (1 ft/sec).

Six years ago the Bio Logos Foundation published an article entitled Christian Geologists on Noah’s Flood: Biblical and Scientific Shortcomings of Flood Geology (Davidson and Wolgemuth 2010).

As of 9/19/2016, this article was freely accessible online at Gregg Davidson and Ken Wolgemuth, present what they believe are strong geological arguments for an old earth.

They made the same claims with the same example in a subsequent, virtually identical, presentation in a widely circulated Christian journal (Davidson and Wolgemuth 2012).

Other old-earth advocates (Morton 2003) also believe this to be a strong argument.

In the past, uniformitarian philosophy taught that clay-rich mudrocks formed by slow settling out of nearly stagnant water.

It also held that thick deposits of clay-rich rocks needed thousands and even millions of years of slow, stagnant clay deposition, as is observed in parts of the deep ocean today. “Spontaneous Stratification in Granular Mixtures.” Nature 386 (6623): 379–382.

Their article claims that the very large number of Lake Suigetsu varve counts is strong evidence for an old earth.

Creation scientists would argue that most of the lamination couplets are not true annual events.

In fact, a plausible explanation for the couplets was presented in the young-earth creationist literature one year prior to Davidson and Wolgemuth’s article.